New Music: DJ Khaled feat. Chris Brown, August Alsina, Jeremih & Future ‘Hold You Down’

02drunk190.1DJ Khaled may be spotlighting his metamorphosis on his forthcoming album I Changed A Lot but his latest release remains true to his “We The Best” mantra. For “Hold You Down,” Khaled celebrates the ladies by tapping every chart-topping R&B dude to sing to ‘em including Chris Brown, Jeremih, August Alsina and (if you count AutoTune wailing serenading) Future. The hip-hop ballad serves as the follow-up to his rap star-studded street anthem “They Don’t Love You No More,” which Remy Ma recently blessed with a remix. Hop into bed with the Bkorn, Lee on the Beats, & LDB-produced after hours banger below, courtesy of Miss Info. “Hold You Down” makes its worldwide debut on BET’s 106 & Park today (Aug. 11).

Barneys Settles Racial Profiling Allegations For $525K

realtalklogoBarneys has agreed to a $525,000 settlement for racial profiling after a nine-month investigation found that the security and staff personnel of its flagship store on New York’s Madison Avenue were targeting minority customers.

According to the New York Daily News, State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman’s investigators interviewed nearly a dozen complainants, including customers and former employees, who noticed a pattern of racial profiling began last year following a “dramatic spike” in shoplifting and credit card fraud.

“This agreement will correct a number of wrongs, both by fixing past policies and by monitoring the actions of Barneys and its employees to make sure that past mistakes are not repeated,” Schneiderman said.

In April 2013, a 19-year-old college student named Trayon Christian said he was racially profiled and accused of fraud by two undercover cops after purchasing a $349 Ferragamo belt at Barneys. Two months prior, 21-year-old nursing student Kayla Phillips said she was also accused of credit card fraud by four plainclothes cops after buying a $2,500 Celine bag.

Rap mogul, Jay Z, came under fire last fall after teaming with Barneys for a holiday collection. He issued a statement, saying, “I am against discrimination of any kind, but if I make snap judgements, no matter who it’s towards, aren’t I committing the same sin as someone who profiles?” Continue reading

Watch: Raekwon Brings Out Troy Ave, Bobby Shmurda, AZ & More At 2014 Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival

raekwon-bk-hip-hop-festivalThis year’s tenth anniversary celebration of the Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival brought a slew of hip-hop heavyhitters to Williamsburg. Following Jay Electronica’s set featuring Jay Z, J. Cole, Talib Kweli and Mac Miller, the legendary Raekwon had a few tricks up his sleeve for his headlining set as well.

While fans may have anticipated a Wu-Tang reunion on the stage, Raekwon switched things up for the crowd by bringing out Internet rap sensation Bobby Shmurda. The newcomer performed his viral hit “Hot Nigga.” The Chef also brought out other natives of the borough: Papoose, Troy Ave, and M.O.P.’s Lil’ Fame. Fans of classic rap got a special treat as well, with an appearance from AZ, who took the stage with “Life’s A Bitch.”

As if seeing Raekwon wasn’t enough. Peep clips from his Brooklyn Hip-Hop Festival set below:
http://www.vibe.com/article/watch-raekwon-brings-out-troy-ave-bobby-shmurda-az-more-2014-brooklyn-hip-hop-festival

The Empowerment Campaign and its Dividends

Originally posted on SDM MAGAZINE:

There is one image from these last few days in Colorado that is going to stick with me, and it is perhaps an unlikely one.  Gabe Cohen , a 33-year-old white guy in a Patagonia jacket, knocks on the screen door of a ranch house belonging to middle-aged black voter. “Hi there,” he says. “I’m with the president’s campaign.” The voter smiles. That’s it. What struck me right then was the power in the word “president,” and the power of what it meant, in that racially mixed neighborhood on the outskirts of Denver, for that word to mean not “them,” but “us.” And that, for a fleeting moment at least, the “us” here was a kind of community encompassing both a white Jewish kid and an older black man. It is an aspirational “us” that, as we saw last night, drove Latinos, and young people, and women, and African-Americans to the…

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