Today’s News Headlines 07.30.12

TODAY’S HIGHLIGHTS
In Syria, U.S. intelligence gaps 
The United States is struggling to develop a clear understanding of opposition forces inside the country, according to U.S. officials.
(By Greg Miller and Joby Warrick) 

James Holmes appears in court 
The Colorado massacre suspect, his hair dyed reddish-orange, seemed lethargic at his first court hearing and did not speak.
(By David A. Fahrenthold and Carol D. Leonnig) 

Pioneering astronaut Sally Ride dies at 61 
Sally Ride, an astronaut and physicist who in 1983 became the first American woman sent into space, died of pancreatic cancer Monday at her home in La Jolla, Calif. She was 61.
(By T. Rees Shapiro and Brian Vastag) 

More intraparty incumbent battles 
Although incumbent vs. incumbent contests won’t be decisive in determining control of the House, they disrupt friendships and help determine the future direction of both parties.
(By Rosalind S. Helderman) 

Returning migrants boost Mexico’s middle class 
In the United States, they were illegal aliens. Back home, they are new entrepreneurs using the billions of dollars earned “on the other side” to create a Mexican middle class as the U.S. economy slowed in the global recession.
(By William Booth and Nick Miroff) 

NATION
Study says young gay black men at high risk for HIV
Newly released data indicate that more than half of all U.S. black men under 30 could be infected with the virus that causes AIDS in the next decade unless improvements are made. 
( by Lena H. Sun , The Washington Post) 

Politicians praise AIDS investment, urge more spending
At the 19th Annual International AIDS Conference, powerful players from Washington and beyond had the same message: We must do more. 
( by David Brown and Alyssa A. Botelho , The Washington Post) 

James Holmes appears in court
The Colorado massacre suspect, his hair dyed reddish-orange, seemed lethargic at his first court hearing and did not speak. 
( by David A. Fahrenthold and Carol D. Leonnig , The Washington Post) 

A little bipartisan light amid the darkness in the House
FINE PRINT | There was some bipartisanship, but the House debate on a defense bill makes one wonder whether Congress can claim to be a serious legislative body. 
(, The Washington Post) 

Environmentalists target Republicans on climate
The League of Conservation Voters’ campaign will target five lawmakers who question the link between human activity and climate change, and will test how voters feel about global warming. 
( by Juliet Eilperin , The Washington Post) 

More National: Breaking National News & Headlines – Washington Post


LOCAL
Former Prince George’s officer sentenced to almost four years
Richard J. Delabrer, a former police sergeant, helped smuggle untaxed cigarettes and alcohol from Virginia to Maryland. 
( by Ann E. Marimow and Miranda S. Spivack , The Washington Post) 

Arlington residents discuss density, streetcars
More than 120 people attend meeting of the County Board. 
( by Patricia Sullivan , The Washington Post) 

Thomas Jefferson H.S. unfair to minorities, complaint alleges
Next year’s freshman class at Thomas Jefferson H.S. includes just 4 percent black and Latino students, who represent 32 percent of Fairfax County’s overall enrollment. 
( by Emma Brown , The Washington Post) 

Federal Faces: Dan Stoneking of FEMA
FEMA’s Dan Stoneking makes sure the government and the private sector collaborate in the wake of natural disasters. 
(, The Washington Post) 

Costco gas station bill up for a vote
The Montgomery County Council will vote Tuesday on the measure, which would block the long-fought project near the Wheaton mall that some say would create a public health risk. 
( by Victor Zapana , The Washington Post) 

More Post Local: Washington, DC Area News, Traffic, Weather, Sports & More – The Washington Post


POLITICS
Engaging the private sector in emergency preparedness and response
As head of FEMA’s Private Sector Outreach, Stoneking has been instrumental in linking the government and the private sector as partners in disaster assistance. 
( by The Partnership for Public Service , The Washington Post) 

GAO report fails to resolve pay dispute
A GAO report does not solve a dispute on whether federal workers are paid too much or too little compared with workers in the private sector. 
(, The Washington Post) 

Federal Faces: Dan Stoneking of FEMA
FEMA’s Dan Stoneking makes sure the government and the private sector collaborate in the wake of natural disasters. 
(, The Washington Post) 

No pay study is definitive, GAO says
Studies have reached widely varying conclusions about how federal and non-federal pay compare, but no one approach is definitive, a GAO report says. 
( by Eric Yoder and Lisa Rein , The Washington Post) 

U.S. tribalism vs. Afghan tribalism
Al Kamen’s In the Loop recommends Rajiv Chandrasekaran’s “Little America,” about the war within the U.S. war effort. 
(, The Washington Post) 

More Post Politics: Breaking Politics News, Political Analysis & More – The Washington Post


STYLE
Carolyn Hax: Finding the balance in parenting
What’s a good book on child-rearing for a couple looking to go “the anti-helicopter route” while still raising a civilized kid? 
(, The Washington Post) 

Quick Spins: Cooly G’s ‘Playin’ Me’
The British artist’s vocals give this album crossover appeal. 
(, The Washington Post) 

Quick Spins: Passion Pit’s ‘Gossamer’
An impressive second outing for Michael Angelakos’s electropop band. 
(, The Washington Post) 

In 2012, AIDS is a different beast for gay men in D.C.
Gay D.C. in 2012 is a very different place than gay D.C. 30 years ago. It’s younger and more populous. More liberated socially and more equal legally. More complacent. But we still need to talk about HIV and AIDS. 
( by Dan Zak , The Washington Post) 

Hot Chip, Sleigh Bells: A disjointed pairing
On Sunday, Hot Chip and Sleigh Bells played hour-long back-to-back sets at Merriweather Post Pavilion. But it wasn’t entirely clear why they paired up in the first place. 
( by Megan Buerger , The Washington Post) 

More Style: Culture, Arts, Ideas & More – The Washington Post


BUSINESS
Why not Uncle Ben’s Crazy Housing Sale?
The time has come for Ben S. Bernanke to announce that the Fed intends to begin buying huge numbers of mortgage-backed securities with the simple intention of bringing the interest rate on a 30-year mortgage down to about 2.5 percent and holding it there for one year, and one year only. 
(, The Washington Post) 

iOS 6 may not require you to enter password when downloading free apps 

( by VentureBeat.com , VentureBeat.com) 

GeoEye, DigitalGlobe agree to $900 million merger
Herndon-based GeoEye will combine with its one-time competitor, pending regulatory approval. 
( by Steven Overly , The Washington Post) 

Spain fears pull down stocks
Spanish borrowing costs soared for the third-straight trading day on Monday, driving European and U.S. markets downward. 
( by Michael Birnbaum and Steven Mufson , The Washington Post) 

Amazon working on multiple Kindle Fires, report says
Amazon is reportedly working on “up to five or six tablets” in different sizes, including a 10-inch tablet that could be a potential competitor to Apple’s iPad. 
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post) 

More Business News, Financial News, Business Headlines & Analysis – The Washington Post


SPORTS
TV and radio listings: July 24
TV and radio listings: July 24 
(, The Washington Post) 

O’s settle for three out of four
Justin Masterson pitches into the eighth inning and prevents Baltimore from completing a four-game sweep in Cleveland. 
( by Dan Connolly , The Washington Post) 

Harper propels Nats past Mets
Bryce Harper belts a home run in his first at-bat in New York, then singles in the 10th inning to help Washington break it open. 
( by Adam Kilgore , The Washington Post) 

ACC coaches react to Penn St. sanctions
Though Monday represented the final day of the ACC’s football kickoff, the upcoming season was largely overshadowed by the Penn State situation. 
( by Mark Giannotto , The Washington Post) 

No job, but a shot at gold
Maryland native Suzanne Stettinius delayed getting a job for a chance at a medal in the modern pentathlon in the Olympics. 
( by Matt Breen , The Washington Post) 

More Sports: Sports News, Scores, Analysis, Schedules & More – The Washington Post


TECHNOLOGY
iOS 6 may not require you to enter password when downloading free apps 

( by VentureBeat.com , VentureBeat.com) 

Amazon working on multiple Kindle Fires, report says
Amazon is reportedly working on “up to five or six tablets” in different sizes, including a 10-inch tablet that could be a potential competitor to Apple’s iPad. 
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post) 

Samsung ships 10 million Galaxy S III units
The Galaxy S III is selling fast, as analysts expect a slow quarter for the iPhone 
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post) 

Google sells out of Nexus 7 16GB model
Users looking to buy the Nexus 7 16GB version are encouraged to enter their e-mail addresses in order to be notified when the company gets more in stock. 
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post) 

16GB Nexus 7 tablet sells out
It appears that the company did not prepare for the tremendous demand the device has attracted thus far. 
( by VentureBeat.com , VentureBeat.com) 

More Technology News – The Washington Post


WORLD
Cross-border shelling raises tension between Afghanistan and Pakistan
Officials say insurgents continue to shell Konar province from the Pakistani side of the border. 
( by Sayed Salahuddin , The Washington Post) 

Returning migrants boost Mexico’s middle class
In the United States, they were illegal aliens. Back home, they are new entrepreneurs using the billions of dollars earned “on the other side” to create a Mexican middle class as the U.S. economy slowed in the global recession. 
( by William Booth and Nick Miroff in SANTA MARIA DEL REFUGIO, Mexico , The Washington Post) 

James Holmes appears in court
The Colorado massacre suspect, his hair dyed reddish-orange, seemed lethargic at his first court hearing and did not speak. 
( by David A. Fahrenthold and Carol D. Leonnig , The Washington Post) 

A little bipartisan light amid the darkness in the House
FINE PRINT | There was some bipartisanship, but the House debate on a defense bill makes one wonder whether Congress can claim to be a serious legislative body. 
(, The Washington Post) 

In Syria, U.S. intelligence gaps
The United States is struggling to develop a clear understanding of opposition forces inside the country, according to U.S. officials. 
( by Greg Miller and Joby Warrick , The Washington Post) 

More World: World News, International News, Foreign Reporting – The Washington Post


EDITORIAL
The next massacre
A murderous rampage we will not try to stop. 
(, The Washington Post) 

Report cites shortage of of public hospital beds for mentally ill
Maryland and Virginia both lost a significant number of public psychiatric hospital beds between 2005 and 2010, a new report says. 
( by Justin Moyer , The Washington Post) 

Mayhem, made in Europe
How the continent enables U.S. gun culture. 
(, The Washington Post) 

The secret in Romney’s taxes
His firm stand reveals more than anything we’ll find. 
(, The Washington Post) 

The betrayal of Happy Valley
Care for Jerry Sandusky’s victims is critical. 
( by John M. White , The Washington Post) 

More Opinions: Washington Post Opinion, Editorial, Op Ed, Politics Editorials – The Washington Post


LIVE DISCUSSIONS
Free Range on Food: Grilling fruit, corn many ways and more
Have cooking questions? We have answers. Ask us now. 
(, vForum) 

Chat with The Container Store’s college organizing expert, Kelly Vrtis | Home Front
Chat with The Container Store’s college organizing expert, Kelly Vrtis | Home Front 
(, vForum) 

Tuesdays with Moron: Chatological Humor Update
Gene Weingarten brings you an update to his monthly Chatological Humor live chat. 
(, vForum) 

Dr. Gridlock
The Washington Post’s Dr. Gridlock, Robert Thomson, will be online to take all your questions about Metro, traffic throughout the region and other transportation issues. 
(, vForum) 

Dr. Gridlock
The Washington Post’s Dr. Gridlock, Robert Thomson, will be online to take all your questions about Metro, traffic throughout the region and other transportation issues. 
(, vForum) 

Is Backlash Against Eric Benét’s ‘Redbone Girl’ a ‘Form of Racism?’

Does the term “redbone” offend you? How about when it’s used to confer a level of superior beauty or as a description of aesthetic preference? If you’re an Eric Benét fan, you may have already heard his single “Redbone Girl.” You also may be aware of the controversy it’s stirring.

The song, which features Li’l Wayne, is an ode to a former light-skinned paramour. The chorus is:

She’s my, redbone girl
A bitter sweet, but she’s my world
Coffee cream, thick and lean
My redbone girl, redbone girl, yeah
She’s my redbone girl
A bitter sweet, but she’s my world
Coffee cream, thick and lean
My redbone girl, redbone girl, yeah

Oprah’s India Special Under Fire

Oprah may be the “Queen of Media,” but she’s still susceptible to the backlash that sometimes comes with the title. She recently documented her trip to India this past January for an upcoming two-part OWN special,“Journey Through India.” Considering this trip to be “her greatest life experience,” Oprah visited a wide array of sites, festivals, parties, regions, and individuals, including a well-off family in Mumbai. During a dinner with the family, Oprah asked her hosts whether “some people eat with their hands still.” In another segment, Oprah is seen visiting a family of five living in cramped quarters. Herein lies the contention that has sparked criticism from many. India Real Time, a highly read and influential newspaper in the country, published a negative Op-Ed about the special that read,”The smell of incense (tick), the sari fitting (tick), the aspirations of slum dwellers (tick), and the glitz of Bollywood (tick). Let’s not forget arranged marriages and the fact that Indians, even rich ones, “still” eat with their hands (tick, tick). India as Westerners imagine it, one stereotype at a time.”  READ MORE

Romney Advisor: “Obama Doesn’t Appreciate Anglo-Saxon Heritage”

Advisors to Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign told British newspaper The Daily Telegraph that Romney would be a better president regarding relations between Britain and the United States because he understands the “special relationship” between the two countries, claimingPresident Obama “does not fully appreciate his Anglo-Saxon heritage” that Great Britain and the United States historically share. “We are part of an Anglo-Saxon heritage, and he [Romney] feels that the special relationship is special,” the adviser said of Romney, adding, “The White House didn’t fully appreciate the shared history we have.” This latest dig at the Commander-in-Chief’s multi-cultural heritage was made ahead of Romney’s arrival in England today, which will kick off an overseas tour that will also take the GOP presidential candidate to Isreal and Poland. Romney will be meeting with Prime Minister David Cameron and his predecessor Tony Blair on Thursday. One interesting thing to note was that when Romney’s advisor was asked the difference in policy between Obama and Romney would be, it was admitted that, in regards to the European economic crisis, “I’m not sure what our policy response is.”

Read it at Mediaite.

4th Annual Styling The Modern Man Presents “Hipster”

WHAT: Join us for the 4th Annual Styling The Modern Man Gala, which will take place at the Novellus Terrace Lobby on Friday, July 27, 2012 from 7-11pm. Guests will experience a greater sense of this brand, as we focus our compass on the idea of the modern Hipster. Of course attendee’s and invited guests will have access to an open bar, catered food (yes people food), grooming and spa services, prize giveaways, a static fashion presentation and a rocking good time. We have a handful of EARLY-BIRD tickets priced at $30.00. Please get your before the price goes up to $40.00. For more details, please visit www.stylingthemodernman.com

WHEN: Friday, July 27, 2012 | 7pm – 11pm
WHERE: Theater Terrace Lobby, 700 Howard Street @ 3rd, San Francisco, CA 94103

OZOMATLI presents “OZOKIDZ” – released September 25th on Hornblow / Megaforce / RED

Over the past seventeen years, celebrated Los Angeles culture-mashers Ozomatli have sung about everything from immigration protests and gang violence to Hurricane Katrina. But with their new project, OzoKidz, the band has immersed themselves in a whole new world of storytelling, one with a very different list of priorities: photosynthesis, spelling, balloons, germs, skateboards, and of course, a runaway moose.

The idea to do the album struck the band after they were asked by PBS to record a series of instructional songs to be featured on-air and on-line as part of the network’s children’s programming. After writing “Opposable Thumbs,” “Nouns,” and “Measurement,” the prospect of creating an original album of their own started to not seem so far-fetched. Offers to record songs for the Warner Brother’s Interactive Elmo’s Musical Monsterpiece and Happy Feet II video games only sealed the deal: OzoKidz was meant to be. So armed with new songs and new stage outfits (rooster masks, anyone?) they started playing family-friendly concerts, landed some opening spots on the Yo Gabba Gabba tour, and then headed into the studio.Recorded at Brushfire Studios in LA with acclaimed producer Robert Carranza (Jack Johnson, Mars Volta), OzoKidz may sound like an Ozomatli album with its effortless bilingualism and trademark swirl of styles and genres — dancehall, merengue, rock steady, rock, hip hop, to name a few– but beyond its sparkling electronic beats and occasionally auto-tuned raps, this is an Ozo album without precedent. Think Burl Ives (“Little Grey Goose,” “Fooba Wooba John”) re-imagined for 21st century, multi-racial urban America.“The big difference with OzoKidz is that the songs are all information based,” says Abers, who takes a rare lead vocal turn on “Skateboard.” “You will learn how a tree grows. You’ll be tricked into exercising by dancing. We wanted to use upbeat, fun songs to help kids think about social issues, to learn about germs, to be educated about their world, to be healthy and active.”Proudly forged in the post-uprising days of 1990s Los Angeles, Ozomatli have always worked tirelessly to spread their music and their message across as many platforms, to as many audiences, as possible. They’ve played an endless string benefits and fundraisers, toured the world as cultural ambassadors of the US State Department, won multiple Grammy Awards, written music for films like A Better Life and video games like Happy Feet II, toured with comedian Gabriel “Fluffy” Iglesias, given their own TED talk, and played with the Boston Pops, New York Pops and The National Symphony. The one audience they hadn’t deliberately reached out to was the next (next) generation of Ozo fans.