Economic Gap Between Whites, Blacks Hasn’t Changed in 50 Years

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Even as racial barriers have tumbled and the nation has grown wealthier and better educated, the economic disparities separating Blacks and Whites remain as wide as they were when marchers assembled on the Mall in 1963. When it comes to household income and wealth, the gaps between Blacks and Whites have widened. On other measures, the gaps are roughly the same as they were four decades ago. The poverty rate for Blacks, for instance, continues to be about three times that of Whites. “The relative position of Blacks has not changed economically since the march,” said William Darity Jr., a professor of public policy, economics and African American studies at Duke University. “Certainly, poverty has declined for everybody, but it has declined in a way that the proportion of Blacks to Whites who are poor is about the same as it was 50 years ago.” Read it at The Washington Post.

Read more at EBONY http://www.ebony.com/black-listed/news-views/economic-gap-between-whites-blacks-hasnt-changed-in-50-years-981#ixzz2dHX34lQg
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Health Myth: Do Men Really Hit Their Sexual Peak at 18?

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Chances are you’ve heard that men hit their peak at 18. But is it really true that men are at the height of their sexual prowess when they’re too young to know what to do with it? It depends on your definition of peak. Around age 18, a guy’s organs (read: his testicles) are producing the most sex-revving testosterone they ever will, according to Ava Cadell, Ph.D., a Los Angeles sexologist and founder of LoveologyUniversity.com. Research shows that barely legal men have the fastest and firmest erections and are the best equipped for encore performances. But it takes about a full decade after your peak output to actually reach your max testosterone levels, meaning a guy’s sexual desire doesn’t actually spike until he’s around 30 years old.

What about the gals? At around 30 years old, women achieve their Big O with more ease than they will at any other age, according to Cadell. Contrary to what’s going on below guys’ belts, women’s sexuality is more psychological than physiological. “As women mature, they become more comfortable in their own skin and gain sexual confidence to communicate their wants, needs, and desires,” she says. Interestingly, a recent survey of more than 12,000 people found that women have the best sex of their lives at 28. Men, on the other hand, reported 33 to be the best sexual age.

Still, it’s important to remember that sexual peaks—whether they’re based on performance or satisfaction—vary from person to person depending on genetics, hormones, relationship quality, and psychological factors.

“The easiest way to reach your sexual peak, regardless of age, is to invest in your health outside of the bedroom,” Cadell says. “Diet and exercise can go a surprisingly long way to improving your sex life—and not just because you’ll look hotter. They can increase testosterone levels, cut stress, and promote healthy blood flow to . . . you know what.” And remember, your bed is for more than just sex. According to a study published in Brain Research, logging enough sleep can help keep your testosterone levels and sex life at their best.

Read More http://www.details.com/blogs/daily-details/2013/06/health-myth-do-men-really-hit-their-sexual-peak-at-18.html#ixzz2cWuNXmvq

The Second Coming of RG3

Everyone was crying. RG3 himself got it started, lying there in his hospital bed, totally immobile. Then his fiancée, Rebecca, and his mom welled up. Jackie never wanted her only son to play football in the first place, not really—what mother wants her son to play football?—but she relented when the 11-year-old pinkie-promised her he wouldn’t get hurt. And now this. Finally, even the quarterback’s military father, Robert Griffin Jr., the retired sergeant, the Iraq vet, “the guy who never cries,” according to his son—not even RG2 could choke back the tears. It was January 9, 2013, three days after Griffin’s historic rookie season ended with a nasty twist of his right knee in a playoff loss to the Seattle Seahawks, and minutes after Griffin had woken up from surgery in Florida, opening his eyes to a real-life nightmare. His blown-out right knee was bandaged, but so was his healthy left one. That meant Dr. Andrews—James Andrews, one of the most celebrated orthopedic surgeons in America, the same guy who rebuilt Adrian Peterson’s miracle knee a year earlier—had needed to take a tendon graft from the left knee in order to repair the right. Two shredded ligaments, the LCL and ACL. Major reconstructive surgery. Seven to nine months of rehab. Minimum. A jumble of thoughts swirled and drifted into his foggy consciousness—flashbacks to the play that knocked him out, fears about whether he’d be ready for next season—and for once in his short and blessed life, Robert Griffin III just couldn’t deal. He didn’t feel like talking to the nurse, who hadn’t noticed that he’d come to. “So instead of trying to cope with that at the moment,” he recalls now, “I just went back to sleep.” ImageWhen he woke a short while later, he felt ready. Or at least readier. As his parents stood over his bed, Griffin apologized. “After I tore my ACL in college, I told them I would never do that to them again,” he says, referring to the 2009 ACL surgery—same knee—that cost him most of his sophomore season at Baylor. “So when I woke up this time, I said, ‘I’m sorry.’ I knew the kind of pain it was going to put them through, especially my mom. I’m the baby. I’m the only son. She doesn’t want to see her baby boy get hurt.”

Dr. Andrews joined them and reported that the procedure had gone well. When the conversation turned to rehab—specifically, When can I start?—Griffin had an idea: “Hey, when’s our first game?”