Author: swaggadigitalmagazine

The NBA Is Coldhearted: Ask DeMar DeRozan

The trade of Kawhi Leonard for DeMar DeRozan reveals something about the gap between image and reality in the NBA.

Screen Shot 2018-07-19 at 5.21.43 AMThere is a pervasive stereotype that the NFL, with its 100 percent injury rate, non-guaranteed contracts, naked collusion against signing political athletes, and constant acrimony between players and management, is cutthroat to its very core. On the other hand, the media narrative around the NBA suggests it’s a “players league” that’s all happy, happy, joy, joy; a Shangri-La for the athlete who is looking to control their own destiny. That narrative was dunked in the trash this week with a trade that has “both primary players involved…furious with the move” The trade in question was Toronto Raptors All-Star forward DeMar DeRozan’s being sent from his beloved team to the San Antonio Spurs, in exchange for another All-Star player more highly regarded but coming off an injury, Kawhi Leonard.

The Spurs felt like they needed to make this move. Leonard was entering the last year of his contract and had already made clear that he had no interest in re-signing with San Antonio. His dream landing spot, according to all reports was the Los Angeles Lakers, his hometown team, where he could play alongside LeBron James. Yet the Spurs had no interest in fulfilling that dream, let alone trading Leonard inside the Western Conference. The Spurs coach, future Hall of Famer Gregg Popovich does not want to helm a rebuilding team at this point in his career, so this trade for DeRozan who still has three years left on his contract, is a very good one for them as they aim to compete with the Golden State Warriors and Houston Rockets this coming season. No rebuilding for Pop.

But, for DeRozan, this move was deeply embittering. He signed a long-term deal in a Canadian market that historically has had a very difficult time keeping star players under contract. But DeRozan was more than just a player happy to be in Canada. He was an ambassador for the city and the team.As NBA reporter David Aldridge tweeted, “Teams have to do what’s in their interest. It’s a business. Having said that, DeMar DeRozan repped Toronto for nine years, selling the virtues of the city…never even took a visit elsewhere when a free agent and was a major part of building that franchise to where it is today.”

For Toronto, the move also makes coldhearted sense. If they are unable to convince Leonard to stay and he leaves the Raptors after one season for the shiny shores of Los Angeles, then at least they have these contracts off their books and can start fresh with a rebuild in 2019. But that does not change the fact that DeRozan is someone who gave all to the team and the city and now feels that he was lied to by Raptors management, who insisted that he was in their future plans. In comments posted on his Instagram page Wednesday morning, DeRozan wrote, “Be told one thing & the outcome another. Can’t trust em. Ain’t no loyalty in this game. Sell you out quick for a little bit of nothing… Soon you’ll understand… Don’t disturb…”

Leonard isn’t thrilled either, with Toronto about as far away from Los Angeles as one can get in NBA circles. “How many trades can you recall where both of primary players involved are furious with the move? Kawhi Leonard asked to go home. Not out of the country. DeMar DeRozan has never wanted to leave Toronto.”

All of this speaks to the original point. The NBA is a ruthless multibillion-dollar operation that will always put the individual needs of players last, if the players themselves fail to seize their own destiny. When players manipulate free agency to create their own “super teams,” the naysayers should bite their tongues. As this DeRozan and Leonard trade shows, if you don’t put your destiny in your own hands—insisting on no-trade clauses or signing short-term deals that allow you to access free agency—then teams will take your destiny and sell it to the highest bidder.

SOURCE: https://www.thenation.com/article/nba-coldhearted-ask-demar-derozan/

Philly mayor wants to evict Jay Z’s music fest amid Meek Mill drama

As controversy continues to rage in Philadelphia over rapper Meek Mill’s probation case — the city mayor’s office has moved to boot the popular Made in America festival created by Meek’s Roc Nation label founder Jay Z.

A rep for Philly Mayor Jim Kenney dropped a bombshell Tuesday that “This is the last year [the fest] will be held on the [Ben Franklin] Parkway.” That was apparently news to Jay Z and Roc Nation — as well as the concert’s promoter, Live Nation.

Screen Shot 2018-07-19 at 5.14.57 AM

Jay Z fired back on Wednesday, revealing in a statement that the mayor’s office also tried to cancel this year’s fest — which will feature Meek Mill, Nicki Minaj and Post Malone, Sept. 1 and 2.

“We are disappointed that the Mayor… would evict us from the heart of the city, through a media outlet, without a sit-down meeting, notice, dialogue or proper communication,” the hip hop mogul wrote. “It signifies zero appreciation for what Made In America has built alongside the phenomenal citizens of this city.”

He added, “In fact, this administration immediately greeted us with a legal letter trying to stop the 2018 event.”

Roc Nation COO Desiree Perez exclusively told us that she’d previously tried to reach out to the mayor’s office and never heard back before the city publicly said the fest would move. “I’d love to have a conversation,” she said. “We’re shocked. We couldn’t believe it. We don’t have a clue about the hostility we’ve received.”

Jay Z said the minority-owned fest that’s included Rihanna, Kanye West and Pearl Jam, has brought $102.8 million to the city, paid $3.4 million in rent and employed thousands.

Reports said that Made in America’s five-year contract ended in 2017 and was renewed for one year.

A rep for the mayor told Philly.com: “When the festival first started, it was intended to provide a unique attraction to the city on the otherwise quiet Labor Day weekend… Over the years, tourism has grown… and the need for an event of this scale at this location may no longer be necessary.”

Jay Z asked in his statement, which he released as an op-ed to the website, “How does an administration merely discard an event that generates millions … and employs the city’s people as if we are disposable now that we have served our purpose?”

Some music fans speculated the city might be targeting a hip-hop-heavy lineup. “Roc Nation got a call that the administration wanted to see this year’s lineup,” which Roc Nation refused, a source said. “What does that have to do with the city?”

The Mayor called the issue a “misunderstanding” and said in a statement to Page Six: “The City of Philadelphia supports the Made in America festival and is greatly appreciative of all that it has done for Philadelphia. We are committed to its continued success and thank them for their partnership. We hope to be able to resolve what has been an unfortunate misunderstanding. We are working with Roc Nation and Live Nation to resolve this issue and we are committed to continuing our partnership with the Made in America festival.”

Cardi B Wants a “Lit” Baby Shower

Don’t expect casual afternoon hors d’oeuvres at Cardi B‘s baby shower, because it’s going to be way more “lit” than that. The 25-year-old rapper is expecting her first child, a baby girl, with fiancé and Migos rapper Offset, 26. The two appear on the cover of Rolling Stone‘s July 2018 issue, which shows him kissing her bare baby bump as she poses naked from the chest down.

cardi b

“I want a lit baby shower,” Cardi told the magazine. “My baby shower’s not starting at no 5:00. My s–t is going to start at 9 p.m. because that’s how I celebrate, that’s how Caribbean people celebrate.” “I don’t like baby showers that be at 5 p.m. in the backyard, eating, cooking hors d’oeuvres. Nah,” she said. “S–t, I might even drink some red wine. Red wine’s healthy, right?”

“Don’t let Mama see you drinking that red wine,” one of Offset’s family members told her, referring to his mother. “She’s going to have a fit.”

Kylie Jenner and Travis Scott on Love, Making It Work, and the Kardashian Curse

She’s a billionaire business mogul. He’s the most electric rapper in the game. How did they come together? How do they make it work? And can they survive the Kardashian Curse? Mark Anthony Green sits down with the world’s most powerhouse power couple.

It’s Kylie, from the jump, who controls the tempo. The youngest Jenner and her well-oiled glam squad bounce around Milk Studios, in Hollywood, with supreme purpose. Her half-male, half-female contingent is like Ocean’s Eleven, except with more crop tops and lip fillers. And instead of a case full of phony casino chips, there’s just a roller bag full of luscious hair extensions that need meticulous untangling. Midway through the shoot, the photographer and stylists start praising a particular photo on the monitor, but King Kylie shuts it down. “People are going to turn it into a meme,” she says, like some kind of social-media medium. “Let’s move to something else.” She later tells me that Kim and Kanye are the ones who taught her to be more assertive on creative things. “I just want the best cover photos for me and for you guys.”

Kylie Jenner and Travis Scott-Modern-Family-GQ-August-2018-03

Joining her in the studio is her 27-year-old partner, Travis Scott. They’ve been together for about a year, but this is their first photo shoot together. What’s the binding force between a rage-thirsty rock star from Missouri City, Texas, and a beauty mogul of Calabasas royalty? Other than their newborn baby girl, Stormi? What’s that shared frequency that’s responsible for the most dynamic celebrity couple of modern times? We’ll get to that, but what I can report is that it’s not a mutual admiration for posing in front of a seamless. Taking pictures is a lucrative sport for one and medieval torture for the other.

Travis has a much smaller team with him. Just his manager—who works from a laptop the entire shoot—and a bag of what smells like some of California’s loudest weed. Between shots, he just kind of paces around, with his head down and his lanky limbs covered in expensive clothes. A wall or photo light would stop him and send him in a different direction. He looks like one of those Microsoft screen savers from the ’90s, careening off the edges of the monitor. “He was whispering to me the whole time,” Kylie tells me afterward, smirking. “He just doesn’t like taking the photos.” Travis hates anything that slows him down. (He even hates restaurants; the man despises wasting time in restaurants.) And he admits that he’s “impatient as a motherfucker” during photo shoots, despite really liking the end result. But it isn’t simply young angst that makes hurry-up-and-wait painful for Travis. It’s “la flame”—the internal fire, the rage, “the piss,” as he calls it, aggression in its funnest form. It’s why Travis, a decade into a notoriously energetic career, has made his case for having the best live show in hip-hop history.

A few years ago, at a nightclub, I saw Travis swing from a chandelier while performing. One of the gold baroque leaves he held on to for dear life cut his hand, and he was beginning to bleed pretty badly. He paused for a second. Smiled. Then pressed his bloody palm against the ceiling, leaving a red handprint, and kept rapping. That energy, that commitment—that’s why there’s an entire generation of young tattooed daredevil rappers coming up behind him who look to Travis as the source, and who’ve taken his lead.

Kylie Jenner and Travis Scott-August-0818-Cover

That may be the thing between the two of them, the binding force: influence. Not in some Adweek marketing sense—in direct-contact-with-the-people kind of way. When they say jump, kids will do it…off a balcony. (That actually happened to Travis.) These two make the mosh pits, memes, and moments that trend and move the needle. They forge 2017’s most overused four-letter word—vibe—and they’re masters at 2018’s: wave. You can’t pause when catching a wave. And that’s their art. Their common thread. Which helps explain how their relationship went from zero to Stormi in just a few months.

“We don’t go on dates,” Kylie tells me. In fact, their first date wasn’t really a date. They were at Coachella—neither can remember where, exactly, they first met—and the whole thing just turned into a hang that went well. While she tells me about it, she begins to giggle about the story she told Travis that got his attention that night. The story wasn’t anything special, but that’s what made it real. How’d you meet your significant other? It starts normal, right?

But then their second date, by all definitions, was anything but normal. They caught the wave. Kylie Jenner—and nearly 100 million followers of hers—just abandoned her life in California and took off on tour with Travis Scott.

“Coachella was one of the stops on his tour,” she explains. “So he said, ‘I’m going back on tour—what do we want to do about this?’ Because we obviously liked each other.”

What do we want to do about this? That’s an early-2000s Matthew McConaughey big-screen-heartthrob line. Holy shit. “And I was like, ‘I guess I’m going with you,’ ” she said, to complete the scene.

READ MORE:https://www.gq.com/story/kylie-travis-cover-2018

Fashion, Culture, Lifestyle, Music, Media