Here’s Why Issa Rae Said Her Mom Couldn’t Watch ‘Insecure’ At One Point

On the promo trail for the Season 3 premiere of Insecure, which hits HBO this Sunday evening, Issa Rae appeared on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.

During the interview she talked about how it took her mom a while to watch the show and she even referred to it as porn!

“It’s taking her some getting used to,” said Rae.

“I want to tell her that’s how I got here (laughs). The fourth episode of our second season was a bit racy, and she texted me and said ‘You’re basically making porn. I don’t know if this is HBO doing this or if this is you, but I can’t watch this anymore. I was like ‘Mom, if you don’t like this episode, you definitely shouldn’t watch episode six.

Her mom didn’t but they watched a future episode as family later.

“We watched the second to last episode at their house as a family and she went upstairs. I was genuinely hurt…but just last month she caved and decided to watch the episodes and said it wasn’t too much and she loves it…now she likes the show!”

Jordan Brand’s ‘Dual-Gender Offense’ Is a Bold Step Forward for Sneakers

jordan

When it comes to icons of the sneaker world, Jordan Brand isn’t exactly hurting. The Air Jordan 1 is, after all, the shoe that put us on the path to the booming sneaker world we know today. And the styles that followed have become mainstays of the culture as well. The question, though, isn’t what the brand got right in the past—it’s how the company is moving into the future while still respecting those roots.

At least, that’s what I wanted to know when I spoke with Jordan’s VP of Design David Creech this summer in Paris, where the brand was showcasing its fall 2018 collection during fashion week. With so much in the archives, and with fans so dedicated to the OG designs, how does a sneaker company keep things feeling fresh? How do the designers keep the old icons alive while creating new ones for a younger generation?

There are no easy answers to these questions. Luckily, Creech was willing to give it a shot. From embracing Jordan’s female fan base to creating new riffs on the classics, here’s how he’s helping shape the brand’s future.

He recognizes it’s a balancing act.

I think it’s a fine line, but it’s a great opportunity for us. How do we keep stretching for the future? Because in design, we have to be about the future. Make no mistake about it: Because we’re fortunate enough to be the Jordan brand, we have the assets and the icons to really tap into, when we need to. So is there a scripted formula? Probably not. But I think it’s something that we constantly, the designers and the brand, have to keep pushing and moving forward in order to really create for the next generation.

READ MORE: https://www.esquire.com/style/mens-fashion/a22651595/jordan-brand-david-creech-interview/

Beyoncé-Approved Tyler Mitchell Is The First Black Photographer To Shoot A Vogue Cover

Tyler Mitchell, a 23-year-old artist from Atlanta, will be the first black photographer to shoot a cover for Vogue in the magazine’s 126-year history. Beyoncé chose Mitchell to photograph her upcoming September issue cover, Yashar Ali reported for HuffPost on Monday. She obtained full control over the cover from Vogue Editor-in-Chief Anna Wintour, a source told HuffPost. “The reason a 23-year-old black photographer is photographing Beyoncé for the cover of Vogue is because Beyoncé used her power and influence to get him that assignment,” the source said. Mitchell, a New York University graduate, quickly became a recognized name in the art world through his work in Cuba and his featured work on Instagram. His more than 40,000 Instagram followers include celebrities like Rose McGowan and Naomi Campbell.

 The New York Times’ “Up Next” series featured Mitchell in December.

“I depict black people and people of color in a really real and pure way,” he told the Times. “There is an honest gaze to my photos.”  The 23-year-old first gained attention in 2015 with his self-published book of photos, El Paquete, which focused on Cuban skate culture and architecture. Mitchell captured the book’s 108 photos while in Cuba for six weeks as part of a documentary photography program, according to the Times. Mitchell’s work has appeared in other magazines, such as Teen Vogue’s March for Our Lives feature. He photographed gun reform activist Nza-Ari Khepra with Parkland shooting survivors Emma Gonzalez, Sarah Chadwick and Jaclyn Corin for Teen Vogue’s piece on the #NeverAgain gun control movement.

The 23-year-old has also shot covers for Fader and Office Magazine.

He has also directed film projects for clients such as Marc Jacobs and Ray-Ban. Mitchell told The New York Times in December that he was editing a three-screen film project he shot with a 35-millimeter camera on how race affects adolescents.

The 23-year-old has also shot covers for Fader and Office Magazine.

He has also directed film projects for clients such as Marc Jacobs and Ray-Ban. Mitchell told The New York Times in December that he was editing a three-screen film project he shot with a 35-millimeter camera on how race affects adolescents.

Michael Ealy Joins Kofi Siriboe-Led MACRO Romantic Drama ‘Really Love’

Michael Ealy has joined Kofi Siriboe in MACRO’s romantic drama, Really Love.
Yootha Wong-Loi-Sing is the woman lead alongside Siriboe. Really Love will be helmed by Angel Kristi Williams in her feature directorial debut. Felicia A. Pride co-wrote the script with Williams. MACRO is financing and producing the film, brought there by producer Mel Jones.

The film is set in a gentrifying Washington D.C. and follows a rising black painter (Siriboe) who tries to break into the competitive art world while balancing a whirlwind romance he never expected. Mack Wilds, Naturi Naughton, Jade Esthe and Uzo Aduba have co-star.  Jones, King, Kim Roth and Aaliyah Williams are producing. MACRO’s Poppy Hanks, Latisha Fortune, Sanford Grimes, Stephanie Allain, Kim Coleman and Pride are executive producers.

Production is underway in Baltimore and D.C.

Justin Bieber Would Like to Reintroduce Himself

beiberSure, Justin Bieber has made mistakes. The monkey. The mop bucket. A few historical desecrations along the way. Then he spent all of last year telling us he was sorry. (Though it turns out he didn’t mean sorry so much as… Well, we’ll let him explain.) Now he’s found a better way to make up with the world: by making the best music of his life—and forcing all of us to rethink what we believe (Beliebe?) about him.

The chicken-finger platter that has just been placed before Justin Bieber is like something out of a children’s book—an illustration from a story about a boy who becomes king, whose first and last royal decree is that it’s chicken-finger time. The dish is so massive that in order to accommodate it, a metal urn filled with enough ice and soft drinks to sustain a pioneer family on a trek across Death Valley is moved to an adjacent table. Tenders are not even listed on the menu of this restaurant; its offerings are confined to ideas like “parsnip purée,” “pomegranate gastrique,” and “dill.” The fingers have been conjured, unbidden, out of the invisible fabric of the universe for Justin Bieber, who is not eating them.

It is an early-January afternoon, and Bieber and I are sitting in a private open-air cabana on the rooftop of the hotel in Beverly Hills where he now lives. Bieber moved into this hotel almost two years ago, after he sold his six-bedroom Calabasas mansion to Khloé Kardashian, following numerous clashes with neighbors and police. (His skate ramp was removed.) He is slight, with rashes of tattoos spreading down both arms. His hair, cropped close on the sides but long enough on top to be tied in a short bleached ponytail, is tucked under a gray Supreme beanie. His feet are snuggled into a pair of café au lait Yeezy Boosts. He is wearing what could be anywhere from two to 41 black sweatshirts of various lengths, layered, and distressed leather pants that retail for $2,590. Everyone else by the pool is wearing clothes; he is wearing fashion. When he arrived just a few minutes ago, he was escorted by a Def Jam executive for the five-second walk from the elevator to this cabana.

READ MORE:https://www.gq.com/story/justin-bieber-gq-interview