“Allow me to reintroduce Alvester, a whole new vibe”

The path to discovering your true passion is rarely an easy road. Case in point: up-and-coming actor, dancer and musical artist Alvester. Before the African-American born performer realized his keen interest for the performing arts, Alvester says he is still a little boy at heart, to his detriment he says at times. But he is definitely self-assured. “It’s not a false self-assurance, not wrapped in arrogance, and cockiness”, it’s actually wrapped in humility and a calmness. He says he knows things are going to happen and it’s God centered. “I believe in myself and I have no self-doubt.”

coverSDM22c-

SDM: Who is Alvester

AM: Alvester Martin is still a little boy at heart, almost to his own detriment at times. At this point in his career and his life, he says he is definitely self-assured.

SDM: How do you feel about doing interviews

AM: I have done a lot of interviews, with so much stuff coming out, he feels like he has a cult following and people don’t really want know who Alvester is. They see past things he has done, like pictures, his Instagram feed, social media posts, and they assume so many things. He says, with great expression, I am totally the opposite of what is depicted in social media.

SDM: How did you get started in the entertainment business

AM: When we first spoke to on the phone about the shoot and we talked about what I wanted, the photographer was surprised me by saying I wanted something basic, and not the “pretty boy” thing.

SDM:Even though he is a pretty boy.

AM: I have been groomed since the age of 5, and have been trained in acting, singing, dancing etc. I feel it’s a gift and a curse. Now that social media is the norm, your judged on who people think you are, and rest on the fact that you are good looking and literally, want to be paid for looking good. However I want people to know that I have much more to offer, than my good looks. When I audition and books gigs, people are so surprised, that I have talent. He says he literally has people contacting him through his social media, and once they have connected they are astonished that he is well spoken. Alvester says he is sometimes bewildered, annoyed and frustrated. Because today’s values place so much emphasis on the looks of person as opposed to their metal. They write you off, before they even find out who you are.

coverSDM22c-2845

SDM: How did you get involved with Black Magic

AM: I feel, society, the casting directors, and the gatekeepers in the industry have said to him when he walks into a room, “Oh I didn’t think you were going to be that good.” It used to bother me! Alvester says and subsequently, he went through a 4-year depression. “I hated doing Black Magic, I felt they mislead me in the pitch and the script”. I thought it was going be great exposure for me and an excellent opportunity to showcase my skills. They knew him as a background dancer for Beyoncé as his body of work to this point. “I felt the transition had already been hard enough to transcend the title of just a dancer, as well as the financial toll, my artistry took a hit, and my Psyche.” I began to turn down jobs, although I needed to eat. “I feel currently there is already a lack of respect in Hollywood, for dancers generally, however I pressed on.” Ultimately, the show was re-pitched and presented again, it took a few times before I said yes! Once the final pitch was presented, I felt that this was going to be a great opportunity to move away from being a background dancer to a recording artist, which was always in the forefront of his journey, In his mind there was always his mindset that he didn’t move to LA to be a background dancer, although he is grateful for what he has done its just he wanted more!

“I went into a deep depression once again and felt I had hit rock bottom and committed career suicide. I had worked years and his parents had sacrificed their monies, and time to get me my training and go forward.”

coverSDM22c-2963

During the filming, it became quite apparent that it was not what he signed up for. The show was about being a stripper, which wasn’t his world. People connected with the show who were on the show were making him feel bad for having worked so many years in the industry and having a standard of expertise. As a result of this experience I went into a deep depression once again and felt he had hit rock bottom and committed career suicide. He had worked years and years and his parents have sacrificed their monies, and time to for my training so I could go forward.

SDM: What is your mindset today and what are your future goals

AM: In final, I’m in a whole different place, I have new music, it’s moodier, and it has an edge its more me. It’s what I like, how I feel, and what I think. My music is my diary in life, I accept my acting career now, I hate slashes, I can sing alone and rest on that, I can act alone, and I can dance alone. It is a blessing to be able to stand on my two feet. My actor career is taking off and its great, I have self-discovery and at this point I feel I am walking into the unknown but in a positive way, and its OK to not always feel OK and be OK, but whatever I feel I put that shit in my work and art.

coverSDM22c-2706

“My acting career is taking off and its great, I have self-discovery and at this point I feel I am is walking into the unknown but in a positive way, and its OK to not always feel OK and be OK, but whatever you feel and whatever I feel put that shit in your work and art.”

coverSDM22c-2941

 

‘Atlanta Skips A Grade

What is “Atlanta,” exactly? It’s a fair but limiting question.

Fair, because, look, if one week you were watching a show about a couple who might have br28oken up at a German-culture festival, and then the next week they’re gone and you’re watching a road comedy about an exasperated rapper and his pathologically distractible barber, and the episode after that is a mini horror film built around a different character trapped in the mansion of a kooky human mannequin, the changeups might feel destabilizing. But the question is limiting since so much TV in general right now resembles no TV that’s come before it.

“Atlanta,” whose second season wrapped up on FX on Thursday night, proudly embodies that development. No episode looked or felt the same as the one before it.

[Read our recap of the Season 2 finale of “Atlanta”]

The show has four central characters — Earn; Alfred; Darius; and Earn’s sometimes ex-girlfriend, Van — who veer in and out of friendship, selfhood, personal clarity and, often, the show itself. In a classic television sense, “Atlanta” is about them. But it’s also increasingly about itself: what its makers can do with the medium, yes, and also what’s possible for the twinned comedies of race and status. It knows the assorted bars a half-hour “sitcom” faces and sets out to raise, vault over and demolish them, to prioritize “sit” over “com.” “Atlanta” is like a rapper obsessed with his own brilliance. You want to see if the show can top itself because that self-regard is part of the hook. But loving this show means worrying that it might be devoured by its own genius, that it’s too great to last, that, eventually, conceit will cannibalize concept. This second batch of episodes was more obviously, aggressively ambitious. The show became cinema (one ominous aerial shot of a vegetal forest canopy made me want vinaigrette) and appeared to have on its mind the ideas in “Get Out,” the moods of “Moonlight,” the hypnotic ambiguities of David Lynch. Some of that reach toward movie-ness nudged the show into self-conscious precocity, the equivalent of skipping a grade.

Listen: Adrian Marcel Returns with New Project ‘GMFU’

adrianmarcelIt’s about time for new Adrian Marcel!

The Bay Area R&B crooner was originally intending to release his debut album GMFU (Got Me Fucked Up) through Republic Records, but plans change and he has finally delivered the project independently today. Following suit to his acclaimed mixtapes, the project is executive produced by his mentor, the legendary Raphael Saadiq, and boasts 16 new songs with production by Saadiq, NO I.D, Big Jerm of ID Labs and more.

The buzz single “Mobbin” contains the only guest appearances with Too $hort, Boosie Badazz and M City Jr. The album opens with the song “UKnowUDo” which features a voicemail left by a female lover who wants to know if they can really be together, or work together, or anything. “Took me a little time but this is my offering to the culture. Thank yall for Rocking with me,” Adrian wrote on Instagram. “R&B is not Dead. Change the narrative.”

Bravo Greenlights 4-Part Special ‘Xscape: Still Kickin’ It’ (Working Title)

screensceneAs TV One preps its previously-announced unauthorized biopic on the group, Bravo Media has giving the greenlight to a four-part special “Xscape: Still Kickin’ It” (working title), chronicling the much-anticipated reunion of one of the most successful, chart topping, female R&B groups of all time. Coming this fall, the series will follow Xscape’s former members Kandi Burruss of Bravo’s “The Real Housewives of Atlanta,” Tameka “Tiny” Cottle and sisters LaTocha and Tamika Scott.

Xscape exploded onto the music scene in the 90’s and emerged as one of the most prolific girl groups of all time. The women had three consecutive Platinum albums, with six of their top-ten songs hitting the Billboard 100. However, fans were shocked at the group’s seemingly sudden split and have been persistently calling for a reunion ever since. With the upcoming 25-year-anniversary of Xscape’s first album release, the women have decided to reunite for this special milestone and most importantly as an ode to their loyal fans.

“We are so excited to team up with Bravo and give our fans an up-close-and-personal look into our lives as we get ready for Essence Fest!” says Xscape. “This process has been a whirlwind with so many ups and downs, but we are loving every minute of being back together, and cannot wait to share the love, laughs, and craziness with you all!”

Each episode will document the group as they attempt to heal past wounds and reconcile after nearly two decades apart, all in an effort to make beautiful music together culminating at Essence’s 2017 Festival.”Xscape: Still Kickin’ It” (wt) is produced for Bravo by Truly Original and Monami Entertainment. Steven Weinstock, Glenda Hersh, Lauren Eskelin, Lorraine Haughton-Lawson and Thomas Jaeger (Truly Original) and Mona Scott-Young and Stephanie Gayle (Monami Productions) serve as Executive Producers.

can you ‘work it?’ missy elliott is looking for backup dancers

Missy Elliot has always delivered supercharged performances. Who can forget when she stole the show during Katy Perry’s Halftime Show in 2015 with a killer melody of her hits? If you think you can keep up with her, this might be your week: she’s holding auditions for backup dancers in Atlanta this Friday.

Missy tweeted the audition announcement yesterday. You must be16 or older, the styles of dance are hip-hop and tricksters, and if you can choreograph, even better.

the A-Z of london menswear

As London Fashion Week Men’s celebrates its fifth anniversary, we salute the vibrant visionaries who make the capital the most exciting place in the world for menswear right now. From the club kids to the collaborators, from the iconic to the opulent and the wild and eccentric, the bespoke and the Nu Lads, we flick through the A-Z of London’s menswear scene. From all the As of Astrid Andersen to the Zeitgeist setting agenda of the Palace skateboards crew.

New Music: DJ Khaled feat. Chris Brown, August Alsina, Jeremih & Future ‘Hold You Down’

02drunk190.1DJ Khaled may be spotlighting his metamorphosis on his forthcoming album I Changed A Lot but his latest release remains true to his “We The Best” mantra. For “Hold You Down,” Khaled celebrates the ladies by tapping every chart-topping R&B dude to sing to ’em including Chris Brown, Jeremih, August Alsina and (if you count AutoTune wailing serenading) Future. The hip-hop ballad serves as the follow-up to his rap star-studded street anthem “They Don’t Love You No More,” which Remy Ma recently blessed with a remix. Hop into bed with the Bkorn, Lee on the Beats, & LDB-produced after hours banger below, courtesy of Miss Info. “Hold You Down” makes its worldwide debut on BET’s 106 & Park today (Aug. 11).