Roots Miniseries: A Cultural Phenomenon

In the simpler media landscape of the late ‘70s, networks considered a show a blockbuster if it was watched in three of every 10 households. When “Roots,” a 12-hour miniseries exploring the multi-generational story of an African-American family, made its historic premiere on ABC during the last week of January in 1977, it could be found on more than half of the nation’s televisions (that night in Los Angeles, the share was 67 percent).

When putting the estimated audience of 130 million into perspective, one network executive said, “it’s like millions of people reading the same book simultaneously.”

Author and journalist Alex Haley made his name exploring different chapters of the African-American story, from Malcolm X to Miles Davis, and the blockbuster miniseries adaptation of his best-selling 1976 masterpiece “Roots” was a prologue to them all. Haley’s family story tells “the symbolic saga of a people,” a tale far more universal than even the most compelling celebrity interview.
Chasing the answer to a simple question of origins, which required the author to spend 6,500 hours in 57 libraries and archives, led to profound answers.

Turf Dancing From Street To Subway

Published on Dec 22, 2014

The Bay Area may be the birthplace of Uber, but here’s something you’d never see while ride sharing: the mad Turf Dancing skills of iDummy, Slow Motion, C4 Boom, Kidd Strobe, No Noize, Turf Bieber, Torch and Phil Of The Future. Together they are TURF NATION. Watch as they turn BART trains into showcases for their mad skills.

Produced by: Chaz Hubbard, Ike Sriskandarajah
Filmed by: Luis Flores, Chaz Hubbard, Mikey Prizmich
Edited by: Chaz Hubbard, Luis Flores, Denise Tejada
Audio Mixed by: Luis Flores

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Richard Sherman Writes About Why It Was Wrong for the Eagles to Release DeSean Jackson

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Even though DeSean Jackson signed a new deal with the Washington Redskins last night,Richard Sherman is not ready to move on and forget the fact that the Philadelphia Eagles released him late last week because of his alleged “gang ties.” Early this morning, Sherman published a new column for The MMQB that offers his take on the Eagles parting ways with D-Jax. And because the Seattle Seahawks cornerback actually grew up with the speedy wide receiver and understands what it’s like to grow up in a rough neighborhood, he was able to offer a pretty unique perspective on why the Eagles shouldn’t have cut Jackson.

“I look at those words—gang ties—and I think about all the players I’ve met in the NFL and all of us who come from inner-city neighborhoods like mine in Los Angeles, and I wonder how many of us could honestly say we’re not friends with guys doing the wrong things,” he writes. “I can’t.”

Sherman also says that if Jackson had been playing for, say, the Seahawks instead of the Eagles, he wouldn’t have been released last week because of his “gang ties.”

“Sorry, but I was born in this dirt,” he writes. “NFL teams understand that. The Seattle Seahawks get it. The Philadelphia Eagles apparently do not.”

To read what else Sherman had to say, go here. Now that Jackson is with a new team, the whole “Is DeSean Jackson really in a gang?!” story is likely going to fade. But it’s important to hear what a guy like Sherman has to say about it. Because it won’t be the last time that a pro athlete is accused of having ties to a gang.

RELATED: Twitter Can’t Believe the Eagles Signed Riley Cooper to a New Contract This Offseason But Released DeSean Jackson Today

Economic Gap Between Whites, Blacks Hasn’t Changed in 50 Years

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Even as racial barriers have tumbled and the nation has grown wealthier and better educated, the economic disparities separating Blacks and Whites remain as wide as they were when marchers assembled on the Mall in 1963. When it comes to household income and wealth, the gaps between Blacks and Whites have widened. On other measures, the gaps are roughly the same as they were four decades ago. The poverty rate for Blacks, for instance, continues to be about three times that of Whites. “The relative position of Blacks has not changed economically since the march,” said William Darity Jr., a professor of public policy, economics and African American studies at Duke University. “Certainly, poverty has declined for everybody, but it has declined in a way that the proportion of Blacks to Whites who are poor is about the same as it was 50 years ago.” Read it at The Washington Post.

Read more at EBONY http://www.ebony.com/black-listed/news-views/economic-gap-between-whites-blacks-hasnt-changed-in-50-years-981#ixzz2dHX34lQg
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Health Myth: Do Men Really Hit Their Sexual Peak at 18?

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Chances are you’ve heard that men hit their peak at 18. But is it really true that men are at the height of their sexual prowess when they’re too young to know what to do with it? It depends on your definition of peak. Around age 18, a guy’s organs (read: his testicles) are producing the most sex-revving testosterone they ever will, according to Ava Cadell, Ph.D., a Los Angeles sexologist and founder of LoveologyUniversity.com. Research shows that barely legal men have the fastest and firmest erections and are the best equipped for encore performances. But it takes about a full decade after your peak output to actually reach your max testosterone levels, meaning a guy’s sexual desire doesn’t actually spike until he’s around 30 years old.

What about the gals? At around 30 years old, women achieve their Big O with more ease than they will at any other age, according to Cadell. Contrary to what’s going on below guys’ belts, women’s sexuality is more psychological than physiological. “As women mature, they become more comfortable in their own skin and gain sexual confidence to communicate their wants, needs, and desires,” she says. Interestingly, a recent survey of more than 12,000 people found that women have the best sex of their lives at 28. Men, on the other hand, reported 33 to be the best sexual age.

Still, it’s important to remember that sexual peaks—whether they’re based on performance or satisfaction—vary from person to person depending on genetics, hormones, relationship quality, and psychological factors.

“The easiest way to reach your sexual peak, regardless of age, is to invest in your health outside of the bedroom,” Cadell says. “Diet and exercise can go a surprisingly long way to improving your sex life—and not just because you’ll look hotter. They can increase testosterone levels, cut stress, and promote healthy blood flow to . . . you know what.” And remember, your bed is for more than just sex. According to a study published in Brain Research, logging enough sleep can help keep your testosterone levels and sex life at their best.

Read More http://www.details.com/blogs/daily-details/2013/06/health-myth-do-men-really-hit-their-sexual-peak-at-18.html#ixzz2cWuNXmvq