Muhammad Ali, Titan of Boxing and the 20th Century, Dies at 74

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Muhammad Ali, the three-time world heavyweight boxing champion who helped define his turbulent times as the most charismatic and controversial sports figure of the 20th century, died on Friday. He was 74.

His death was confirmed by Bob Gunnell, a family spokesman.

Ali was the most thrilling if not the best heavyweight ever, carrying into the ring a physically lyrical, unorthodox boxing style that fused speed, agility and power more seamlessly than that of any fighter before him.

But he was more than the sum of his athletic gifts. An agile mind, a buoyant personality, a brash self-confidence and an evolving set of personal convictions fostered a magnetism that the ring alone could not contain. He entertained as much with his mouth as with his fists, narrating his life with a patter of inventive doggerel. (“Me! Wheeeeee!”)

Ali was as polarizing a superstar as the sports world has ever produced — both admired and vilified in the 1960s and ’70s for his religious, political and social stances. His refusal to be drafted during the Vietnam War, his rejection of racial integration at the height of the civil rights movement, his conversion from Christianity to Islam and the changing of his “slave” name, Cassius Clay, to one bestowed by the separatist black sect he joined, the Lost-Found Nation of Islam, were perceived as serious threats by the conservative establishment and noble acts of defiance by the liberal opposition.

Loved or hated, he remained for 50 years one of the most recognizable people on the planet.

Economic Gap Between Whites, Blacks Hasn’t Changed in 50 Years

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Even as racial barriers have tumbled and the nation has grown wealthier and better educated, the economic disparities separating Blacks and Whites remain as wide as they were when marchers assembled on the Mall in 1963. When it comes to household income and wealth, the gaps between Blacks and Whites have widened. On other measures, the gaps are roughly the same as they were four decades ago. The poverty rate for Blacks, for instance, continues to be about three times that of Whites. “The relative position of Blacks has not changed economically since the march,” said William Darity Jr., a professor of public policy, economics and African American studies at Duke University. “Certainly, poverty has declined for everybody, but it has declined in a way that the proportion of Blacks to Whites who are poor is about the same as it was 50 years ago.” Read it at The Washington Post.

Read more at EBONY http://www.ebony.com/black-listed/news-views/economic-gap-between-whites-blacks-hasnt-changed-in-50-years-981#ixzz2dHX34lQg
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Health Myth: Do Men Really Hit Their Sexual Peak at 18?

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Chances are you’ve heard that men hit their peak at 18. But is it really true that men are at the height of their sexual prowess when they’re too young to know what to do with it? It depends on your definition of peak. Around age 18, a guy’s organs (read: his testicles) are producing the most sex-revving testosterone they ever will, according to Ava Cadell, Ph.D., a Los Angeles sexologist and founder of LoveologyUniversity.com. Research shows that barely legal men have the fastest and firmest erections and are the best equipped for encore performances. But it takes about a full decade after your peak output to actually reach your max testosterone levels, meaning a guy’s sexual desire doesn’t actually spike until he’s around 30 years old.

What about the gals? At around 30 years old, women achieve their Big O with more ease than they will at any other age, according to Cadell. Contrary to what’s going on below guys’ belts, women’s sexuality is more psychological than physiological. “As women mature, they become more comfortable in their own skin and gain sexual confidence to communicate their wants, needs, and desires,” she says. Interestingly, a recent survey of more than 12,000 people found that women have the best sex of their lives at 28. Men, on the other hand, reported 33 to be the best sexual age.

Still, it’s important to remember that sexual peaks—whether they’re based on performance or satisfaction—vary from person to person depending on genetics, hormones, relationship quality, and psychological factors.

“The easiest way to reach your sexual peak, regardless of age, is to invest in your health outside of the bedroom,” Cadell says. “Diet and exercise can go a surprisingly long way to improving your sex life—and not just because you’ll look hotter. They can increase testosterone levels, cut stress, and promote healthy blood flow to . . . you know what.” And remember, your bed is for more than just sex. According to a study published in Brain Research, logging enough sleep can help keep your testosterone levels and sex life at their best.

Read More http://www.details.com/blogs/daily-details/2013/06/health-myth-do-men-really-hit-their-sexual-peak-at-18.html#ixzz2cWuNXmvq