Tag: music

Bad Bunny and J Balvin Talk Upcoming Joint Album and the Rise of Latin Trap | Complex Cover 1,031,788 views

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Lee en Español.

A mob of people swarm Bad Bunny, the Puerto Rican rapper, yelling his name. “Oh my god,  he’s so sexy,” one teenage girl squeals. Another, in complete shock, shouts: “I touched him.” But Bunny isn’t fazed. Dressed in a maroon Alexander Wang anorak jacket with matching shorts, long tan socks, brown Gucci hiker boots, and mirrored sunglasses, with his fingernails painted yellow, he flashes a smile and takes selfies with them.

In certain New York City neighborhoods, Bunny might not be as recognizable. Not here, though. Throughout the shoot for this cover, the predominantly Latino residents of the area surrounding Brooklyn’s Knickerbocker Avenue followed his and Colombian artist J Balvin’s every move. Some even managed to find the nondescript bar where we filmed, waiting outside for hours and screaming every time the door swung open. They wanted to catch a glimpse of Bunny, the 24-year-old Latin trap king, and Balvin, reggaeton’s answer to Drake.

Reggaeton’s long been a fixture in the Spanish-speaking world, but in 2004 it exploded in the U.S. with Daddy Yankee’s hit “Gasolina,” off his album Barrio Fino. The genre’s had its ebbs and flows since then, but it has recently found a massive new market, thanks in part to the global success of Luis Fonsi’s “Despacito” remix featuring Justin Bieber and Daddy Yankee—the most streamed song ever—and, of course, Balvin’s steady hit-making and Bunny’s arrival.

Last year, Balvin (real name José Álvaro Osorio Balvin) released his megasmash “Mi Gente” with French DJ and producer Willy William, followed by a remix featuring Beyoncé. Both songs were everywhere; the original currently has over 2 billion views on YouTube, while the remix has over 79 million. But those two songs weren’t just major successes on the charts. More than that, they helped other Latin rap artists, like Bunny, cross into the mainstream.

Born Benito Antonio Martínez Ocasio, Bunny started his career by uploading songs to SoundCloud while still a student at the University of Puerto Rico. But in two short years, he’s become a phenomenon. “Soy Peor,” the track that established the Latin trap sound, caught the ear of the U.S. audience; it’s been streamed 13 million times on SoundCloud. Balvin’s “Si Tú Novio Te Deja Sola”—a song Bunny first composed with the artist in mind—has been nominated for a Latin Grammy. He’s collaborated with big-name American artists like Nicki Minaj (“Krippy Kush”), Cardi B (“I Like It”), Chris Brown (“Dime”), and Drake on an unreleased song.

Together, Balvin and Bunny are leading the charge in bringing reggaeton to the American market once again. The best part about that is they’re doing it on their own terms—a new sound, painted fingernails, eccentric outfits. We haven’t seen anything like them before, but if you ask them, that’s the point.

 

Bad Bunny and J Balvin, two of reggaeton’s most recognizable faces, are Complex’s latest cover stars. They sit down with Rapetón editor-in-chief Angel “El Guru” Vera to discuss how they first met, the rise of Latin trap, and what they think it takes to be an icon. Bunny also explains why he hasn’t released an album and reveals that he has an upcoming joint album with Balvin.

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Reviews: T.I. Hits Benchmark With “Dime Trap” Album

 

T.I. has often compared himself to 2Pac, and the claim makes sense in that both have touched on enough topics to fill 100 Wikipedia pages. Tip’s 10th proper album, Dime Trap, loudly silences any concerns over what he has left to say. The album functions as a compelling retrospective of T.I.’s life and career while proving he’s far from finished.

Billed as a “TED Talk for hustlers,” Dime Trap‘s thug motivation qualities are evident. “Looking Back” finds the Rubberband Man giving hustlers and civilians some tough love: “Tell me what you gon see when you looking back at yo life/Won’t be worth a damn if you ain’t living it right.” His words could easily come off as judgmental if Tip weren’t so transparent about his old hell-raising habits: “In Vegas, fightin’ police, me and Jeezy and ‘em/Hit the strip, Fatburger, did my thing again/All I do is kick back, blow gas and smile/Reminiscin’ ‘bout the days I was young and wild.” Tip’s front-porch reflections position him as the elder statesman he’s become and imbue Dime Trap with a sense of well-earned wisdom.

Everyone at Afropunk looked like a damn dream Afropunk style is never missable. This year was no exception.

Personal style at major music festivals can be generally watered down and frankly, a little lame, but not at. Afropunk. Attendees of the music and arts festival, now in its thirteenth year, looked as lush and happy as ever. Flower crowns, which have been having a moment in fashion, were ever-present and larger than life. Shades of bright yellow were inescapable, and skinny shades returned sleeker and chic-er than ever. Many of the impressive looks we captured were handmade by the wearers themselves. Peep some of our favorites from the weekend below. MORE PICTURES

 

Drake, Cardi B Lead 2018 AMAs Nominations With 8 Each: See the Full List

The 2018 American Music Awards nominations are in!

Drake and Cardi B lead all artists with eight total nods each. Drake will compete against Imagine Dragons, Post Malone, Ed Sheeran and Taylor Swift for the night’s top honors — artist of the year. Cardi B will face off with Camila Cabello, Khalid, Dua Lipa and XXXTentacion for new artist of the year.

Voting begins now in all categories — except new artist, favorite social artist and collaboration — on Billboard.com. Voting for the final three categories begins Monday, Sept. 24 on TheAMAs.com. The 2018 AMAs — hosted by Tracee Ellis Ross — air live Oct. 9 on ABC at 8 p.m. ET.

Here is the full list of nominations.

ARTIST OF THE YEAR
Drake
Imagine Dragons
Post Malone
Ed Sheeran
Taylor Swift

NEW ARTIST OF THE YEAR PRESENTED BY CAPITAL ONE
Camila Cabello
Cardi B
Khalid
Dua Lipa
XXXTENTACION

COLLABORATION OF THE YEAR
Camila Cabello ft. Young Thug, “Havana”
Post Malone ft. 21 Savage, “Rockstar”
Bruno Mars & Cardi B, “Finesse”
Bebe Rexha & Florida Georgia Line, “Meant To Be”
Zedd, Maren Morris & Grey, “The Middle”

TOUR OF THE YEAR
Beyoncé & JAY-­Z
Bruno Mars
Ed Sheeran
Taylor Swift
U2

VIDEO OF THE YEAR
Camila Cabello ft. Young Thug, “Havana”
Cardi B, “Bodak Yellow (Money Moves)”
Drake, “God’s Plan”

FAVORITE SOCIAL ARTIST
BTS
Cardi B
Ariana Grande
Demi Lovato
Shawn Mendes

FAVORITE MALE ARTIST — POP/ROCK
Drake
Malone
Ed Sheeran

FAVORITE FEMALE ARTIST — POP/ROCK
Camila Cabello
Cardi B
Taylor Swift

FAVORITE DUO OR GROUP — POP/ROCK
Imagine Dragons
Maroon 5
Migos

FAVORITE ALBUM — POP/ROCK
Drake, Scorpion
Ed Sheeran, ÷ (Divide)
Taylor Swift, reputation

FAVORITE SONG­ — POP/ROCK
Camila Cabello ft. Young Thug, “Havana”
Drake, “God’s Plan”
Ed Sheeran, “Perfect”

FAVORITE MALE ARTIST — COUNTRY
Kane Brown
Luke Bryan
Thomas Rhett

FAVORITE FEMALE ARTIST — COUNTRY
Kelsea Ballerini
Maren Morris
Carrie Underwood

FAVORITE DUO or GROUP — COUNTRY
Dan + Shay
Florida Georgia Line
LANCO

FAVORITE ALBUM — COUNTRY
Kane Brown, Kane Brown
Luke Combs, This One’s For You
Thomas Rhett, Life Changes

FAVORITE SONG  — COUNTRY
Kane Brown, “Heaven”
Dan + Shay, “Tequila”
Bebe Rexha & Florida Georgia Line, “Meant To Be”

FAVORITE ARTIST — RAP/HIP­HOP
Cardi B
Drake
Post Malone

FAVORITE ALBUM — RAP/HIP­HOP
Drake, Scorpion
Lil Uzi Vert, Luv Is Rage 2
Post Malone, beerbongs & bentleys

FAVORITE SONG — RAP/HIP­HOP
Cardi B “Bodak Yellow (Money Moves)”
Drake “God’s Plan”
Post Malone ft. 21 Savage “Rockstar”

FAVORITE MALE ARTIST — SOUL/R&B
Khalid
Bruno Mars
The Weeknd

FAVORITE FEMALE ARTIST — SOUL/R&B
Ella Mai
Rihanna
SZA

FAVORITE ALBUM — SOUL/R&B
Khalid “American Teen”
SZA “CTRL”
XXXTENTACION “17”

FAVORITE SONG — SOUL/R&B
Khalid “Young Dumb & Broke”
Ella Mai “Boo’d Up”
Bruno Mars & Cardi B “Finesse”

FAVORITE ARTIST — ALTERNATIVE ROCK
Imagine Dragons
Panic! At The Disco
Portugal. The Man

FAVORITE ARTIST — ADULT CONTEMPORARY
Shawn Mendes
P!NK
Ed Sheeran

FAVORITE ARTIST — LATIN
J Balvin
Daddy Yankee
Ozuna

FAVORITE ARTIST — CONTEMPORARY INSPIRATIONAL
Lauren Daigle
MercyMe
Zach Williams

FAVORITE ARTIST — ELECTRONIC DANCE MUSIC (EDM)
The Chainsmokers
Marshmello
Zedd

FAVORITE SOUNDTRACK
Black Panther: The Album, Music From And Inspired By
The Greatest Showman
The Fate of the Furious: The Album

How Joe Budden Became the Howard Stern of Hip-Hop As a rapper, Joe Budden had a hit 15 years ago — and then a string of bad luck and poor choices. Now he has emerged as a podcast star.

Screen Shot 2018-08-23 at 9.57.20 PMThis wasn’t how Joe Budden planned on becoming famous. In fact, he didn’t plan much of anything. Now he’s on the charts, but not for his music.

Instead, as of Thursday, Joe Budden has the No. 1 podcast on the iTunes music podcast chart — five slots ahead of the NPR standard-bearer “All Songs Considered.” The Joe Budden Podcast With Rory and Mal is produced at a friend’s house in Queens.

Mr. Budden had a brief taste of mainstream success as a rapper with a Top 40 hit in 2003 before his career stalled. Now he has become a kind of volatile elder statesman of hip-hop, holding forth on his podcast, social media and YouTube before an audience of millions. His soliloquies and tirades, whether a careful examination of a rap diss or a nuanced defense of XXXTentacion, the controversial young rapper who was murdered in June, lend him a credibility he never quite had as an artist.

Mr. Budden is now banking on a new partnership with Spotify to expand on his success. Starting this fall, his podcast will stream exclusively on that platform. (He plans on still uploading videos of the show on YouTube.) The goal, according to Courtney Holt, head of studios and video at Spotify, is to “develop out not just this show, but other shows in the future.” When asked why he thought Spotify was the best home for his show, Mr. Budden said simply, “They weren’t afraid of me.”

Seated at the dining room table in his Montclair, N.J., home, Mr. Budden is just as he seems as a podcast host: expressive and candid and unembarrassed to recount a series of personal and professional misfortunes and poor decisions, from his battles with addiction, messy physical fights that spilled onto social media to rap beefs and shady recording contracts that left him broke for most of his rap career.

He was also accused of beating an ex-girlfriend, and even though charges were dropped, the allegations continue to dog him. “Even if you’re innocent of those things, therapy teaches you to always pay attention to the part that I played in things,” Mr. Budden said. “I didn’t do any of that stuff, but how did I get here? I frequented strip clubs, I popped pills. My life was in disarray. It made me say, ‘No more.’”

READ MORE: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/22/nyregion/how-joe-budden-became-the-howard-stern-of-hip-hop.html